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April 27, 2011/FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media Contact: Liz Wooley, wooleyl@uncsa.edu, 336/734-2924

 

UNCSA’s Spring Dance Concert to feature world premieres by acclaimed French choreographer Eric Oberdorff and
School of Dance faculty-artist Susan McCullough
Works by Feld and Petipa round out program


WINSTON-SALEM— Spring Dance Concert, the University of North Carolina School of the Arts (UNCSA) School of Dance’s annual spring showcase, will feature world premiere pieces choreographed by France’s acclaimed Eric Oberdorff and UNCSA faculty- artist Susan McCullough. Works by Eliot Feld and Marius Petipa will round out the diverse program of ballet and contemporary dance, performing May 12-15 at the Thrust Theatre in Performance Place on the UNCSA campus.

The program opens with Oberdorff’s world premiere, Holden C. Inspired by their youth, their daily struggles and their possibilities as dancers, the piece is a reflection of the group of dancers the audience sees on stage. Oberdorff choreographed the piece with the dancers rather than entering rehearsal with the dance already mapped out.  Holden C. is one piece of a larger cycle of new works Oberdorff has been creating with pre-professionals, connecting each cast to an iconic figure that reflects their cultural environment.  Holden C. is named for Holden Caulfield, the central character of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, as Mr. Oberdorff views Caulfield as a metaphor and symbol for American youth. Holden C. marks Oberdorff’s first creation in the United States.

After a ten-minute intermission, the program resumes with Eliot Feld’s A Stair Dance. The entire dance takes place on a set of stairs, highlighting quick and intricate footwork.  The piece is being restaged by Patrice Hemsworth, who has worked with choreographer Eliot Feld for the past 20 years as ballet mistress, teacher and director of faculty for the lower school at Ballet Tech.




Photos by Steve Davis Photography

French Choreographer Eric Oberdorff of Compagnie Humaine guides the student dancers with their movements for Holden C., a new work in UNCSA’s Spring Dance Concert.

Following a brief pause, students will take the stage to perform Susan McCullough’s world premiere piece, ___Scape. McCullough describes her piece as a presentation of two different groups, one focused around a central figure and the other on the pulse of everyday life, and how the two groups move in and out of each other’s existence.

The program concludes with Marius Petipa’s Paquita, a piece widely regarded as a major cornerstone of traditional classical ballet repertory. School of Dance faculty-artist Nina Danilova will restage the piece.

Performances will take place at 7:30 p.m. May 12-14 and at 2 p.m. May 15 at the Thrust Theatre in Performance Place on the UNCSA Campus at 1533 South Main St., Winston-Salem.  Tickets are $12 for adults and $10 for students and seniors.  For more information or to order tickets, call the UNCSA Box Office at 336-721-1945 or visit www.uncsa.edu/performances. 

The University of North Carolina School of the Arts is the first state-supported residential school of its kind in the nation.  Established as the North Carolina School of the Arts by the N.C. General Assembly in 1963, UNCSA opened in Winston-Salem (“The City of Arts and Innovation”) in 1965 and became part of the University of North Carolina system in 1972. More than 1,100 students from high school through graduate school train for careers in the arts in five professional schools: Dance, Design and Production (including a Visual Arts Program), Drama, Filmmaking, and Music. UNCSA is the state’s only public arts conservatory, dedicated entirely to the professional training of talented students in the performing, visual and moving image arts. UNCSA is located at 1533 S. Main St., Winston-Salem. For more information, visit www.uncsa.edu.

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**High-resolution photos available upon request**

 

            

 

 

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